Way of St. James

Starting immediately, in addition to the Parish Office Saint Nicolaus, there are two other official sites where pilgrims can get a stamp in their pilgrimage passport: at the city information centre in "Wesel am Großen Markt" as well as in the town hall. The stamp from both new sites show a pilgrim with a donkey as well as a scallop shell.

 

Business hours stamp sites

 

The Rhenish Pilgrim Trail No. 4 through Wesel

(Nimwegen - Kleve - Xanten - Cologne with Wesel as additional stage Z2)

Wesel is located on sections of the Way of St. James in Westphalia and on the Lower Rhine. As an important Hanseatic city, an important trade path ran through Wesel, which connected the Rhineland with the North Sea. Countless pilgrims followed this route to the saints of the Rhineland, but also to Rome and the holy James in Santiago de Compostela.

The St. James' Way through the Rhineland describes the 228 km path between Nimwegen and Cologne, a 2000-year-old route that includes the entire left side of the Lower Rhine. The feeder stage makes it possible for Wesel to enter this pilgrimage route and simultaneously acts as an interface to the Westphalian pilgrimage network.

The pilgrimage route in Wesel starts at Martinistraße and leads to the Klever-Tor-Platz (inner courtyard of town hall, St. James' Way stele) to the Willibrordi Cathedral before it goes to the new Rhine bridge. On October 23, 2009, the St. James' Way stele was inaugurated at the Wesel town hall. A hospital was built near this spot in 1291, which took in all pilgrims on their way to Santiago de Compostela.

The Westphalian pilgrim trail no. 4 through Wesel

(from Bielefeld through Münster to Wesel)

The path to Wesel leads from Bielefeld through Münster to the Lower Rhine to Wesel and then connects to the Rhine routes to Cologne. The 200 km long route is divided into ten stages, which are 12-26 km long. The pilgrimage route from Bielefeld leads straight through Germany and other European countries to Santiago, marked with the characteristic scallop shell.

The land on the Lower Rhine is perfect for moving forward without much effort - on foot or by bicycle - where you can let your thoughts roam and get your head free. The routes are mostly accessible and also ideal for those in wheelchairs or families with buggies.

History of the St. James' Way

The history of the St. James' Way goes back to medieval times. Pilgrims from all over Europe have come on foot or by horse to Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain since the 10th century. The grave from the apostle St. James the Great is located here. By going on this route and visiting his grave, pilgrims hope for their body and soul to be healed. In earlier times, criminals could avoid their penalty if the court sentenced them to go on the pilgrimage. The scallop shells that the pilgrims could purchase and visibly wear in Santiago acted as a sign of proof and recognition.

In 1987, the Council of Europe declared the route as the first European cultural path. Since then, the "Camino di Santiago" has experienced a great renaissance - also because the infrastructure of the individual routes in Spain as well as in Europe was restored using financing from the EU.

The old routes were reconstructed and given new signs in Westphalia and in the Rhineland. The Landschaftsverbände Westfalen (LWL) and Rheinland (LVR) were responsible for this.

 

Pilgrim accommodations in Wesel

Slaapplekken voor pelgrims in Wesel

Camping Erholungszentrum Grav-Inse

Gravinsel 1, 46487 Wesel

Tel: +49 (0)281-972830,

www.grav-insel.com

Haus Pooth

Dorfstraße 3, 46487 Wesel

Tel: +49 (0)2859-235

www.haus-pooth.de

 

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